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When you look up at the clear New Hampshire night sky, with whole clouds of stars looking back at you, it’s quite a sight.

When you look at them with a camera with better night vision than your own, and keep seeing it show countless stars in areas of the sky where you can only see the brighter ones, something dawns on you.

You can see only a tiny nothing fraction of the stars in the sky. Your camera can see a slightly larger tiny nothing fraction of the stars in the sky. When the Hubble Space Telescope looks at a tiny dot-sized spec of sky, it sees whole traffic jams of stars vying for room. And that itself is even a tiny nothing fraction of what is out there around us.

When you look out at the Void, if you look carefully, you find an awful lot looking back at you. And you realize you have no idea how much is looking back at you. Look out at the universe, and the universe really does look back at you.

The sky must essentially be a solid bowl of stars. Along with stars, there is a comparably vast amount of dark matter, much of it known as planets. It is not illogical to state that given such a large quantity of planets, it is statistically excessively improbable that somewhere out there is at least some bacteria clinging to a rock, somewhere. Whatever’s out there, when you look out at the universe, the universe looks backs at you in return.









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